Defend DACA: Seven Things You Can Do Today

Image Credit Carpe Diem Los Angeles

#DEFENDDACA

Instead of sitting and seething over yet another debacle initiated in the name of law and order, here are seven things you can DO:

1. This HuffPo piece has links so you can send an email to the White House, contact your representatives and senators, and a nice little script to help you communicate your displeasure with President Trump’s action to stop DACA.

2. You can text RESIST to 50409 and it will walk you through a process to fax your senator. Yes, I know. Faxes?? Whatever it takes to #DefendDACA. And if that means faxes, so be it.

3. Do you live near a college or university campus? You can check this list to see if that campus is a sanctuary campus and connect your church with student leaders.

4. Not near a college or university campus? How about the high school district you live in? Give the administration and your local government offices a quick call and let them know you are concerned about any actions ICE (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement) may try to take against DACA recipients, because their names are all in a database and there is no promise from the current administration that the list will not be used to initiate mass deportations.

5. Consider attending a demonstration to participate and learn. Better yet, take someone with you. You can make a quick sign by flipping USPS priority mail boxes (they are free at your local post office) and turning them inside-out, or taping white paper or posterboard to them for a sign that will withstand some wind. Home improvement stores will also give you a few free paint stirring sticks for a nice handle.

6. Educate yourself on DACA, what your representatives and senators have said or voted on past immigration reform bills, etc. For example, did you know Chinese, Koreans, and Indians are among the fastest-growing segments of undocumented immigrants? This chart shows us who was eligible to apply for DACA until Trump’s announcement.

7. You can read and then sign the Theological Declaration On Christian Faith and White Supremacy and invite others to join you.

Why do I care?

I care because I am a Christian who happens to live in America.

I care because I had the privilege and unearned advantages of being a documented resident who could afford the time and money to go through the naturalization process.

I care because these are human beings, created in God’s image, who jumped through arbitrary hoops and now are being told “too bad, so sad” with threat of deportation if in six months Congress doesn’t pass the Dream Act or some other bill to protect their status and give them a path to citizenship.

I care because my call has been to the college and university campus where thousands of DACA recipients and hopeful dreamers are living out their academic dreams and where I as a campus minister hope they will encounter Jesus’ Good News and be my co-laborers in sharing the Good News with other students. They can’t if in six months they are deported to countries they do not know.

There is plenty of time for sitting and seething. This is not the time. #DefendDACA

Kathy Khang is a writer, speaker, and coffee drinker based in the north suburbs of Chicago. You can connect with Kathy at her blog, on Facebook, or on Twitter and Instagram @mskathykhang. This article originally appeared on the author’s blog, and is republished here by kind permission of the author.

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