Nonviolent Action Method #1: Public Speeches

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On August 28, 1963, more than 200,000 people gathered in Washington, DC, to hear Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. deliver his “I Have a Dream” speech.

(You can read more about the different methods of nonviolent protest in Gene Sharp’s book The Politics of Nonviolent Action. Access CSA’s catalogue of Sharp’s methods here, or download the full list of 198 methods here.)

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Nonviolent Action Method #8: Banners, Posters, Displayed Communications

From Gene Sharp

The Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace was a movement of thousands of women who, among other efforts, bravely took to the streets united under a banner that said, “The women of Liberia want peace now.” The movement’s organizer, Leymah Gbowee said, “It was the first time in the history of Liberia that Muslim women and Christian women came together.”

(You can read more about the different methods of nonviolent protest in Gene Sharp’s book The Politics of Nonviolent Action.

Nonviolent Action Method #18: Displays of Flags and Symbols

From Gene Sharp

Displays of Flags and Symbols
This technique showcases the flag or colors of a national, religious, social or political group, in a form of nonviolent protest that draws on the existence of deep emotions or from the intention to stir them.