What is Right with the World

Photo by thomaswhitaker / pixabay.com

For at present we all tend to one mistake; we tend to make politics too important. We tend to forget how huge a part of a man’s life is the same under a Sultan and a Senate, under Nero or St Louis. Daybreak is a never-ending glory, getting out of bed is a never-ending nuisance; food and friends will be welcomed; work and strangers must be accepted and endured; birds will go bedwards and children won’t, to the end of the last evening. And the worst peril is that in our just modern revolt against intolerable accidents we may have unsettled those things that alone make daily life tolerable. It will be an ironic tragedy if, when we have toiled to find rest, we find we are incurably restless. It will be sad if, when we have worked for our holiday, we find we have unlearnt everything but work. The typical modern man is the insane millionaire who has drudged to get money, and then finds he cannot enjoy even money. There is danger that the social reformer may silently and occultly develop some of the madness of the millionaire whom he denounces. He may find that he has learnt how to build playgrounds but forgotten how to play. He may agitate for peace and quiet, but only propagate his own mental agitation. In his long fight to get a slave a half-holiday he may angrily deny those ancient and natural things, the zest of being, the divinity of man, the sacredness of simple things, the health and humor of the earth, which alone make a half-holiday even half a holiday or a slave even half a man.

It will be an ironic tragedy if, when we have toiled to find rest, we find we are incurably restless.

There is danger in that modern phrase ‘divine discontent.’ There is truth in it also, of course; but it is only truth of a special and secondary kind. Much of the quarrel between Christianity and the world has been due to this fact; that there are generally two truths, as it were, at any given moment of revolt or reaction, and the ancient underlying truism which is nevertheless true all the time. It is sometimes worth while to point out that black is not so black as it is painted; but black is still black, and not white. So with the merits of content and discontent. It is true that in certain acute and painful crises of oppression or disgrace, discontent is a duty and shame could call us like a trumpet. But it is not true that man should look at life with an eye of discontent, however high-minded. It is not true that in his primary, naked relation to the world, in his relation to sex, to pain, to comradeship, to the grave or to the weather, man ought to make discontent his ideal; it is black lunacy. Half his poor little hopes of happiness hang on his thinking a small house pretty, a plain wife charming, a lame foot not unbearable, and bad cards not so bad. The voice of the special rebels and prophets, recommending discontent, should, as I have said, sound now and then suddenly, like a trumpet. But the voices of the saints and sages, recommending contentment, should sound unceasingly, like the sea.

Excerpted from What is Right with the World by G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936).

23 Shares

You may also want to read

Celebrating Real Love on Valentine’s Day

By Kristyn Komarnicki

How about we celebrate Valentine’s Day this year, not with red hearts and rhyming sentiments and roses but with spiritual hearts committed to discovering what real love looks like, love that is founded on and nurtured by an understanding of God’s design for relationships?

For Those Who Failed at Lent

By Benjamin Capps

 

For those of you who have already failed on your Lenten commitments, I want you to know, I’m with you.

By now it is probably evident, even to the most occasional of church attenders, that we have thoroughly entered into the long, somber, and glorious tunnel of Lent.